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What is a Grain Window?

A grain window defines the engineered grain  [weight] carrying capability of a fly rod blank under line load.

The primary purpose of printing the grain window on two handed fly rods is to guide the caster in achieving a correct and balanced rod/line set up.

Dialling in to the lower end of the grain window:

The low end of the grain window defines the minimal amount of grains that will allow the rod to load efficiently.

  • The low end of the grain window would most often be applied by those fishermen wanting to use the power in the top 1/2 to 2/3 of the rod. Many experts often refer to this as casting off the tip of the rod
  • Casting off the top of the rod is often used by those casters that want to use light [grained] shooting heads combined with minimal anchor. This is typical of the Scandi style “touch-and-go technique”. This type of cast is best performed with an extremely compact economical stroke, minimal energy with the power coming predominantly from the “under” hand.

Dialling in to the higher end of the grain window:

The high end of the grain window defines the maximum amount of grains [weight] that  will allow the rod to load efficiently.

  • The high end of the grain window would most often be applied by those casters wanting to distribute power and grain load so as to utilise the loading capability of the whole rod; taking power way down into the cork. This is also known as fully or deep loading the rod.
  • Normally The type of casting stroke required to best load the rod deeply varies with the type of line used:
    • Skagit Style Heads: Skagit or sustained anchor casts are best accomplished with an extremely compact economical stroke, minimal energy with the power coming predominantly from the “under” hand.
    • Spey Lines: Classic or modern Spey casts are best accomplished with an open stance, long stroke with the power coming from a balanced combination between the upper and lower hand.

 

 

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