9 comments


  • (y) !

    February 05, 2014
  • Andrew Parker

    Great articles Stuart. Do you have time for an ignoramus’ question
    Following from “part 3: Determining the Correct Sink Tip Length” I’m interested to know how you would choose the correct length of leader (I wouldn’t want to be cutting back into the CCT if it is the leader which is too long)

    Thanks, Andrew

    February 05, 2014
    • bff

      Hello Andrew – good question. No rocket science here – if I am fishing in coloured water then I just use about 1m of tippet looped on to the front of CCT, and if I am fishing in cold clear water (like on many of the rivers in Norway) then I would use up to about 1.5m to 2m of tippet.

      Hope I could help – Stuart

      February 11, 2014
  • Jari Koski

    Nice article again. I just love stopping by here. Always something new going on.

    Setting up a comfy sink tip is very important when learning to use and fish with sink tips, but… After you get past the basics then it is the fishing that dictates what tip to use. Choosing the correct sink tip for conditions at hand is many times very crucial if you want to catch fish:)

    February 20, 2014
    • bff

      Thanks for your feed back Jari, its always appreciated. Perhaps you could give us some examples of the tips you use under which circumsatnces…

      February 20, 2014
  • Jari Koski

    Hi Stuart, would love to do so. These are based on the use of a floating belly. When you use a higher density belly these things change.

    I like to use short tips(6-8′) in low water conditions if I’m fishing so called pocket water. Those short tips have also been very handy for estuary fishing for pacific salmon in low water conditions.

    Standard tips(10-13′) are excellent for getting and keeping your bigger tubes down and are the nicest tip length to use (ImHO). Normal water conditions and plastic tube flies is the scenario that I use these tips the most. Very good tip length also for fishing slower water for pacific salmon/steelhead. I think a 12′ tip fished of a floating skagit gives you a very nice swing and that certain good feel that you need to get a pull.

    Long tips (13-16′) are for deep holes/pockets and fishing slower runs in high water. I personally rarely use anything over 15′. I change the density of the belly if i need more umph in my swing.

    I have noticed that the choice sink tip sometimes makes a big difference in your success. The best thing about using a multi-tip line system like a skagit is that you just carry a set of tip in your pocket and change your tip in mid run if necessary. All and all some spots just fish better with one tip then the other.

    February 23, 2014
    • bff

      Jari thanks a lot for sharing your experience with us.

      February 24, 2014
  • Jari Koski

    I wish I was better at writing in english. It’s just so slow and hard to get your “message” through when your writing in a foreign language. Maybe I should start learning German? Who knows, I might do a better job at that?

    BTW: one more thing to think about when choosing your tip and the density of your belly is the speed of the surface current. The faster it goes, the longer the tip or the denser your belly needs to be, if you want your fly to go down and stay down.

    These new short skagit heads are in my opinion ideal for fishing pocket water with short tips. You can really get the fly to “hang” in those pockets by mending and lifting the running line out of the water. There’s so little belly in the water to create drag.

    February 24, 2014
    • bff

      Hej Jari your English is very good (much much better than my Finish 🙂 ) and your the message comes over very clearly. Well done …
      … and thanks for the additional tip.

      February 24, 2014

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