CCT’s explained – part 3: Determining the Correct Sink Tip Length

 Introduction

Skagit heads combined with modern Spey rods have changed our approach to sink-tip fishing not just for steelhead but also for Atlantic salmon; we now have the ability to fish heavier sink-tips and larger flies than ever before. However, with this change has come some confusion. With the wide range of Skagit heads and sink-tip materials available on the market today it’s difficult to know what’s right for your type of fishing and moreover what’s right for your Spey rod! In this series of articles we hope to throw some light on the subject.

The first article of the series is an introduction to sink-tips, the second is all about is matching Sink-Tip grain weight to your Head weight, this the third explains how to determine the correct Sink-Tip length for your casting style and Rod, the fourth explains how best to cast heavy sink tips and the final article pulls it all together and shows you how to lift your game up to the next level.

Have fun.

PerryPoke

Sink-tip Length
While sink-tip weight is extremely important, sink-tip length cannot be overlooked. Back in the early days of Skagit there was there was a formula that said your total length of your Skagit head and sink-tip should be about 3 to 3 ½ times your rod length.  Say what???  Not only did that formula confuse the hell out of the majority of anglers, it also goes against the point of casting Skagit heads.  In an effort to create a formula to standardise the length of Skagit heads, it made things far more complicated than they already were.

Sink-tip length is all about personal preference and casting style.  A taller fly fisherman will cast differently to a shorter angler; the taller guy will naturally have a longer casting stroke, which means he can cope with longer sink-tips e.g 12ft to 15ft.  Whereas the shorter caster will probably prefer shorter sink-tips say in for example 10ft to 12ft range.  Casting style will also effect the length of your sink-tips; a relaxed long stroke style is good for longer tips, and a compact aggressive style is better for shorter tips.  And of course, finally a longer 15ft rod will potentially handle much longer tips than a 12ft rod.

This all sounds pretty complicated but to sum it up in our experience most anglers who fish with a 12ft to 14ft rod seem to get on best of all with a 12ft’ish sink-tip.  A 12ft’ish sink-tip will cover most of the fishing situations found in European salmon rivers.

Fine Tuning
However if you would rather determine your ideal sink-tip length yourself and not just take our word for it then we suggest starting with your heaviest sink-tip cut approximately to the length of your rod. Then go to your local river or lake, tie on a length of leader and the largest fly you intend to use for salmon (or steelhead) and cast a few times. If it doesn’t feel good, then cut back the sink-tip (by say increments of 10cm) and keep repeating until you have found the ideal length for your stroke.  According to Tim Rajeff (and he explained the process to us) it is absolutely critical to start with your heaviest sink-tip.

Once you’ve found your preferred tip length of your heaviest sink-tip, you can cut down your other tips to match the length and grain weight.  Let’s start using some hard values to help explain this a bit better. For example let’s say your heaviest sink-tip for your ECHO 13’0 #7 TR Spey rod is 12ft of T-14, at fourteen grains per foot it weighs approx. 170 grains.   Your slower sinking tips should weigh no more than 170grains and the length should be no longer than that of your heaviest sink-tip.  If we cut 12ft of T7 we end up with a sink-tip which weighs approx. 94grains and you now have two sink-tips with different sink-rates for the same length.

Ultimately, your goal is to end up with a set of sink-tips that match your casting stroke and Skagit head of choice; if you decide 12ft is your preferred length, ideally all of your sink-tips should be around 12ft.  By having a consistent length, your casting stroke won’t have to change every time you change your sink-tip.  It is of course possible to cast using different lengths of sink-tips, however your stroke length will have to change as your sink-tip length changes.  For good Spey casters this is a no brainer but for beginner and intermediate anglers having a consistent casting stroke takes the pain out of casting which results in a massive boost of self-confidence.

CCT’s explained – part 2: Sink Tip Grain Weight

Skagit heads combined with modern Spey rods have changed our approach to sink-tip fishing not just for steelhead but also for Atlantic salmon; we now have the ability to fish heavier sink-tips and larger flies than ever before. However, with this change has come some confusion. With the wide range of Skagit heads and sink-tip materials available it’s difficult to know what’s right for your type of fishing and moreover what’s right for your Spey rod? In this series of  articles we hope to throw some light on the subject.

The first article in this series introduced Sink Tips or CCT’s (Custom Cut Tips), this the second is about Sink-Tip grain weight, the third tells you how to set up the correct Sink-Tip length and the fourth pulls it all together and shows you how to lift your game up to the next level.

Have fun.

 

Tom Larimer

 

Sink-tip Grain Weight

Before we start discussing how you match sink-tips to your Spey rod, we need to understand a little about sink-tip grain weights and density. The weight of sink-tips (and Skagit heads) is measured in grains (!!). One grain equals 0.065grams but before you get out your smart-phone and start calculating, the industry has simplified things; T14 weighs 14grains per foot, T10 weighs 10 grains per foot and so on. So for example, a 10ft AirFlo T-14 sink-tip (AirFlo call them CCT’s or Custom Cut Tips) would weigh 140 grains (14 grains x 10 feet = 140 grains).  AirFlo sink-tips are available in 10ft and 18ft lengths, with colour coded loops on one end for ease of use and weight/density recognition

CCT’s are impregnated with Tungsten and sink like a brick.

 

IMG_1369[640x427]

I know it may seem strange for those of us used to metric based systems, but getting our head around grain weight is important for two reasons:

1. Sink-rate: with AirFlo CCT’s the higher the number on the package, the faster it sinks. For AirFlo CCT’s the weights/densities/sink rates are:

  • T-7: 7 grains per foot, white loop, sink rate approximately 7ips (inches per second)
  • T-10: 10 grains per foot, orange loop, sink rate approx. 8ips
  • T-14: 14 grains per foot, brown loop, sink rate approx. 9ips
  • T-18: 18 grains per foot, black loop, sink rate approx. 10ips

To help you get a feeling for the sink rate of the CCT’s an AirFlo Extra-Super-Fast-Sinking Polyleader has a sink rate of approximately 6.5ips and a “type 7” head/line approximately 7ips.

2. Head Weight:  Head weight! What the +~ß% has head weight got to do with my sink tip? In the world of Skagit, head weight has everything to do with sink-tip weight; you need mass to move mass. Heavy sink tips require heavy Skagit heads to cast them … ideally by about a 2:1 ratio.  For example, couple a 390 grain ECHO Skagit Compact with any sink-tip up to 145 grains; match a 450 grain ECHO Skagit Compact head with any sink tip up to 225 grains; a 540 grain Compact Skagit head with any tip up to 270 grains; the 660 head with tips up to 330 grains; and the 810 Skagit Compact for long heavy anchor chains. Get the idea?

In the next article of this series we will be discussing sink-tip lengths.

 

CCT’s explained – part 1: An Introduction

Skagit heads combined with modern Spey rods have changed our approach to sink-tip fishing not just for steelhead but also for Atlantic salmon; we now have the ability to fish heavier sink-tips and larger flies than ever before. However, with this change has come some confusion. With the wide range of Skagit heads and sink-tip materials available it’s difficult to know what’s right for your type of fishing and moreover what’s right for your Spey rod? In this series of three articles we hope to throw some light on the subject.

This, the first article, introduces the sink tips or CCT’s (Custom Cut Tips) we use, the second is about Sink-Tip grain weight, the third tells you how to select the correct Sink-Tip length and the fourth pulls it all together and shows you how to lift your game up to the next level.

Custom Cut Tips CCT's

T10, T14 and T18

CCT’s – Custom Cut Tips an Introduction

CCT’s or Custom Cut Tips is the name given to the type of sink tip we use. They were designed by Tim Rajeff and Tom Larimer for use with the ECHO series of Skagit Lines and they are manufactured by AirFlo in the UK. Although primarily designed for use by anglers in the PNW for targeting steelhead, we have used them extensively for pursuing Atlantic salmon in Europe and we believe that combined with the appropriate Skagit head they offer an excellent “easy to use” alternative to fishing with a heavy sunk line.

CCT’s come in two lengths 18ft/5.5m and 10ft/3m. So if you fish 10ft/3m or shorter sink-tips, purchase the 10ft/3m tip and fish it “as is” or cut it back to the required length, conversely if you fish longer tips, go with the 18ft/5.5m tip and cut to length.  Most anglers seem to prefer a 12ft/3.65m sink tip for salmon or steelhead, however if you’re fishing a big Springer or Winter Steelhead River or alternatively chasing Kings up in Alaska, then you’ll want 15ft to 18ft tips.

Each of our sink-tips has a heavy-duty factory welded loop which is colour coded to identify the density; the black loop is T-18, brown is T-14, orange is T-10 and white is T-7.  Basically, the darker the loop, the faster it sinks.  So even if you have no idea what the density is, if you’re fishing a sink-tip with a brown loop and you keep hooking the bottom, mount the sink-tip with the orange loop on to your [Skagit] head.  If you still continue to hang up, put the white loop sink-tip on. We think that Tim Rajeff’s colour coded system makes sink-tip fishing a no brainer!

The next article in this series talks about sink tip grain weight to Skagit head weight ratio’s ….

 

Sssshhh Top Secret

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We asked Dec Hogan what his secret is for casting a slow-ish deep loading 2-hander like the ECHO Dec Hogan series.  The preciseness of Dec’s answer took us by complete surprise:

“Slooooow down.

Not much rocket science in that … great stuff Dec 😀

 

Posted by BFF from WordPress for Android

The Myth about Skagit Rod/Line Length Ratios

We have often been asked for the “rules” surrounding rod length line length ratios for skagit casting. Well who better to talk about that than the man himself  …

 

… this is part of a thread written by Ed Ward on the skagitmaster forum.

 

” ….. Skagit Rod/Line length Ratios
– Maximum Line length (belly + tip) – 3.5 times rod length.
– Minimum Line length (belly + tip)  – 1.75 times rod length.
 
   These figures are often stated as “rules” and for beginning/novice casters, they should be thought of as such. The max length of 3.5 has been determined by the fact that lines longer than this ratio become increasingly difficult to position and sweep without breaking the arms away from the body. “Breaking away” is counter productive to the “effortless power” aspect of Skagit casting because that effortless power action is dependent on keeping the pivot point of the sweep movement as compact and tight-to-the-body as possible.
   The minimum length of 1.75 has been determined by the fact that line lengths less than this ratio are difficult to maintain sufficient anchoring of the line on the water during the forward casting stroke to conduct that forward casting stroke without prematurely blowing the line off of the water.
   My recommendation for general purpose casting/angling or entry-level casters is a ratio around 2.75 to 3. Longer ratios of 3 to 3.5 are used for achieving maximum distance as that follows the “longer line, longer casts” rule of flycasting in general. A less-than-2.5 ratio would be selected primarily for tight quarters casting as the shorter the line, the shorter the resulting D-loop. Also, shorter ratios will increase the capacity of any given rod/line system to cast heavier tips and/or flies because “compacting” the overall weight of the line into a shorter package increases the grains-per-foot status of the line.
   As stated earlier, these rod/line ratios are presented as “rules”, but for advanced/expert casters that have established an effective, efficient Skagit casting “core” (Sweep-Turnover-Casting Stroke sequence), these rules become guidelines that can be “breached” to accomodate specialized situations. Lines longer than 3.5 can be cast by “breaking away” during line positioning movements, but one must then “re-establish” – AFTER the line is “set” and BEFORE conducting the Sweep – a “tight, fixed, central” casting pivot point… not exactly an easy action for a novice or even intermediate caster to accomplish. Lines less than 1.75 times rod length can be cast by lowering the plane of the Sweep, increasing the speed of the Sweep (to keep the lower altitude line from hitting the water) and narrowing the separation-of-planes action of the Turnover to a measurement of inches… another not-so-conducive-to-novice-casters process. These are actions that demand constant, vigilant attention and as such are only employed for VERY specialized situations, even by expert casters. …”